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the economy to improve, but at a slower rate than the united states and develops nations. he's attending the g20 finance minister meetings. from the council on foreign relations, this is an hour. >> [inaudible] >> well, ladies and gentlemen, i'm cochair of the council on foreign relations, and we are privileged, indeed to have with us the honorable, highly experienced german government offiho crrently serving a minister o finance. you have the resumÉ, we are running late, and to maximize time for conversation, i'll be undipmatically brief, but let me say that minister has held four positions of chandler cole who served as federal minister for special tasks, head of the council and minister of the interior. under chancellor merkel 2005 to 2009 served as ministers of the interior. he is a long standing leader of the christian democratic union serving as its chair in 1991. he's bee a 1972 serving as parment ri whip from 1981-84, and in 1990, led negotiations for the reimplication of east east germ. he is proficient in economics of law, a doctor of law, and he's written a number of books most rec
, that doesn't involve risks to the government micromanaging the economy. if you say okay which is going to have a flat tariff of 10% or 20% or 30% whatever it takes to get to a zero trade deficit that doesn't introduce a lot of corruption or a lot of dangers bad policymaking because it's a very simple policy. it's just determined by an arithmetical formula and there's no opportunity for anybody to play games. one of the good things about it if you have a flat tariff, is if you had a 30% tariff on imported goods that's not enough to relocate the production of t-shirts that united states because cost is too great. it's great to relocate things like silicon wafer fabrication so would tend to relocate back to the u.s. high value capital-intensive skill intensive industries which is of course what we want to do. those are the industries that are high-quality -- high-quality into she wants to have and those are the industries that don't want to lose. i point that out just to point out that if you do get serious about protectionism, protectionism has a logic to it which if you understand what
or does it matter if an economy will print or grow or whatever? >> the study which said once government debt hits 90% of gdp growth goes off a cliff has been thoroughly discredited and they must kick themselves that they made a mistake on the spreadsheet. people pay attention to the paper which has just come out that shows that this is a pretty sloppy piece of work. the conclusion drawn in terms of the impact of high debt to growth has been basically discredited now. it's fairly clear that governments have a lot more scope to deal with problems. >> was china wrong to pursue this strategy then to help cushion the effect of the global financial crisis and even though people are quite concerned about it including some of the chinese themselves, it sounds like from what you're saying all things considered you don't see a hard landing or crisis as a result. >> as you always say in china, it's too early to tell. i think they have a margin to get things right. if you look at greece, they went into european monetary union and have this lovely window to fix things. a lot of credit with foreign i
rights prevail our countries where people do better, economies thrive, rule of law is stronger, governments are more effective and more responsive, and they are countries that lead on the world stage and project stability across their regions. strong respect for human rights isn't merely an indicator that a country is likely doing well. it actually unleashes a countries potential, and it helps to advance growth and progress. so i ask you just to think of the country like burma for a minute. because of steps towards democratic reform and stronger human rights protections, a country that had been isolated for years is now making progress. as it reached where we wanted to be? know, but it's on the road. it's moving. and more people are contributed economy and participating in the government, leading toasr growth andnt. and by starting to embrace universal rights, the burmese government has opened the doors to a stronger partnership with their neighborhood and with countries around the world. many challenges remain. corruption has to be rooted out. remaining political prisoners nee
say that the last ten years has been very bad for the economy. we've lost a lot of valuable resources and a lot of the momentum that we've had on. before, we had open markets and entrepreneurship and that's what helped china succeed. we have to go back to market forces as well as fight construction. >> so juan nubol there talking about the last decade. he was the guy that tried to buy 300 kilometers of ice and is we'll talk about that a little later, as well. clear now there is a hope for reform. i'm pleased to say kung mingh, the founder of lenovo who bought the business from ibm, he explained to eunice what he wanted from private reform to help private business in the country. >> translator: my view is that the chinese government should adopt a more systemic and comprehensive approach, for example, how to escape a better sense of reform in this country so that the public will have more confidence in ensuring the culture of mutual trust can be established. >> what's interesting is that this group, also becoming more influential in political circles. we'll hear a little later from the
the economy french economy is in. now, the german survey responses say the economies were worried about the impact prices. in france, they're much more domestically focused with some suggestions that things couldn't get any worse. >> well, the domestic situation is already a known negative. just to recap for viewers, as well, the composite, which includes both the services and is manufacturing, pmi came in at 46.5 in april for the eurozone. that was just ever so slightly above the 46.4 estimate and manufacturing came in 46.5. the services figure was 46.6. but, again, it's some of the weakness in the core economy of germany that's catching the market's attention this morning. the euro weaker, the xetra dax off by about 0.2%. we're going to get some uk data out at 9:30. also coming up on the show, the how companies are battling to take a foothold in the alternative energy market in china. then at 11:10, we'll be joined by jim o'neill as he nears the end of his tenure at goldman sachs. we'll get his best and worst investment calls from his time in the city. we'll hear up for earnings from
francisco, oakland, seattle, and tacoma combined, upon which a bulk of the u.s. economy relies. we must strengthen recovery in the event of a biological attack, which is still the most worrying threat out there. we need to make sure that the public understands the nature of these threats and how it can help identify and respond to them. above all, it needs to understand how not to respond to them. when bad things happen, it's easy to react out of fear, emotion and anger. let's hope that in boston this week we begin to chart a different course. for more on this, you can read my column in a special edition of "time" magazine on the tragedy in boston. let's get started. >>> joining me now the man who runs the biggest police force in america and one of the country's best intelligence divisions, ray kelly, the commissioner of new york. what do you have to tell us in the aftermath of this? is there a heightened sense of danger? are you seeing threats proliferate? >> no, we haven't seen an increase in threats, but our operating assumption is that we're always at risk. we're a city that obvious
economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change fidelity can help you jafflet your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today the fidelity i.r.a. has a wagering of choices to fit your personal economy. fidelity investments, turn here. >> bbc world news was captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: the surviving suspect in the boston bombings was charged today with the use of a weapon of mass destruction. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we update the investigation, both in the u.s. and abroad, into the two brothers believed to be behind the blasts, as the youngest remains hospitalized in serious, but stable condition. >> ifill: and we explore the legal questions raised by trying dzhokhar tsarnaev in federal court. >> brown: then, ray suarez gets an update on guantanamo bay, where more than half the prisoners are now on a hunger strike, protesting their indefinite detentions. >> ifill: paul solman ha
despite the fact that these jobs are among the highest paying and the most stable jobs in our economy today. it is imperative that we encourage more young americans n.i.t. e studies in the fields. in particular because of the stark racial and gender gaps we see in the programs, it is imperative that we encourage more young women and students of color to enter these fields. we simply won't be able to remain a global leader in these mportant fields without more -- with more than 50% of our nation's brainpower sitting on the sidelines. h.r. 967 doesn't go as far as i would like it to go in addressing these challenges but it does show the need to educate more students in n.i.t. fields and provide the necessary authority for the agencies to pay an important and appropriate role here. and finally, i would be remiss not to mention that nitr-d program serves as a coordinating and planning umbrella for all unclassified federal cybersecurity r&d. our committee addressed specific needs in cybersecurity , r&d separately in h.r. 756 but in doing so, we made sure that both the intellectual and fina
with the underpinnings of education and issues like that then allow us to be competitive in a global economy. i think the potential is there. we need to get our act together and that means we need to sit down, work together and resolve issues. .ost: larry, ohio independent caller. caller: good morning. host: good morning. caller: this gentleman keeps referring to the crime scenes, the violent crimes. 99% of us gun owners are law- abiding and that is the way we use our guns. internet sales -- you cannot ship a gun in the united states unless it is shipped by a fll dealer and once you receive that done at your dealer, you have to go through background checks. on the crystal ball thing -- host: larry, let me leave it there and have the congressman respond because that is the front page of "the new york times" dealing with internet sales. what do you make of his comment? guest: first of all, we do have background checks today, but the problem is there are loopholes. the number is about half of the gun sales in the country are not subject to a background check. some are emaciated on the internet. some are
. >> this is what a personal economy looks like. as life changes, fidelity can help you readjust your investments along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your plan as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help fine-tune your personal economy. fidelity investments -- turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." "bbc world news america "reporting from washington. the white house says yesterday's bombing does not seem to be part of a broader plot. >> this was a heinous and cowardly act. given what we now know about what took place, the fbi is investigating it as an act of terrorism. >> but who did this and why is still a mystery. authorities are asking the public to hand in any photos or video recordings. amid tight security, london prepares for the funeral of
unemployment. and she revolutionized the economy with free-market ideas in her ten years of service that ushered in a new decade of prosperity. when she took office, the top income tax rate was 83%. it was cut to 60% and then to 40%. the middle tax rate was cut to 30%. and the lowest tax rate was eliminated altogether. when she took office, the top corporate tax rate was 53%. she cut it to 35%. the top capital gains tax rate was a stifling 75%. thatcher cut it to 30%. and as a result, a progrowth policies, unemployment fell from a high of 12% early in her tenure to 7.5% near the end. public spending as a percentage of g.d.p. fell from 45.1% of g.d.p. to 39.4% of g.d.p. and inflation fell from almost 22% in 1979 to a low rate of 2.4% in 1986. but perhaps the most telling tribute to margaret thatcher's leadership is that three days after she gave her britain await speech, that heroic speech she was dubbed "the iron lady" in the communist news outlet "the red star." when your military enemies are describing you as formidable as the iron lady, it indicates that you're winning the argume
. it begins to affect the economies in the area. certainly within the district i represent. yet there's always a persistent demand for more. the persistent demand usually comes from washington and not the border communities that they want more. some of those communities are the safest in the country. but the fact remains that if we are going to make security the linchpin and put dollars on top of dollars, taxpayer money, and there's a lack of transparency and oversight, i am not sure that this is not just become another symbolic gesture and the outcome continues to be one that is in doubt and people keep demanding more. host: for yourself representing a border state, as co-chairman of the progressive caucus, if any legislation that comes to be in the house and senate include border security as the linchpin to a pathway to citizenship, the border has to be secure before the 11 million people can get on a pathway to citizenship, if that's the case, are you a yes vote? guest: no. arbitrary triggers should not be part of the legislation. it's my understanding that there been a time of three years
something horrible to happen, or you need a total collapse of the economy. i don't see either. >> well, we're actually talking about two different events. relative to a correction this year, i think that we're looking at something similar to 2011. 10 to 20% off in the second or third quarter, kind of a reaction to this building uncertainty, this volatility we have seen since february. in terms of the bigger crash call that i've been making for more than a year now, as the s&p continues to top out very similar as it did in 2000 to 2007, i think you're right. i think that we are looking at some kind of external shock situation. >> no, no, i'm not -- i'm saying that's what you need to make your forecast right. i'm not predicting that. i don't see the end of the world scenario. i don't buy it. >> and i hope that bernanke -- >> gold signal. i just don't buy it. and so much liquidity -- seema, are you hearing this end of the world -- all right. let's take abigail. 10 to 20% correction. are you hearing that? >> if the fed pulls back on monetary support sooner than expected, i think there are trad
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you.
closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help fine-tune your personal economy. fidelity investments -- turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." "bbc world news america "reporting from washington. the white house says yesterday's bombing does not seem to be part of a broader plot. >> this was a heinous and cowardly act. given what we now know about what took place, the fbi is investigating it as an act of terrorism. >> but who did this and why is still a mystery. authorities are asking the public to hand in any photos or video recordings. amid tight security, london prepares for the funeral of margaret thatcher. but first, there is still one last stop at westminster. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. we will go to the end of the earth to identify those responsibl
said, joe. she marked a total sea change in britain's relationship with the market economy before she came into power and anything that was considered important in the post-war british era was controlled by the state. nobody would do that today. she had a very permanent difference in the way britain see the mark of the economy and we are now a country which is the product of margaret thatcher's economic vision. >> steve rattner, i have been amused by commentary coming out of great britain one after another after another kr criticizing margaret thatcher on how she took on the unions and there is that line it had to be done. you were a "the new york times" reporter there. you have said the margaret thatcher is why great britain is great britain today and not italy or spain or greece. >> look. i agree. to me, it seems very clear that when she did was to save great britain from economic irrelevance and i think what may explain a little bit of the difference between the british view and the american view is that what she did was radical by british standards because britain had moved so clo
they want in a bill. but if we meet in the middle, can do a lot of good for and for our economy. and so we're feeling very good about this. things are moving in a very, very good way. and the president's support of our proposal, even though he wouldn't fully agree with it, it's just the right place to be, because we want lots of support even from people who agree with every single part. i don't want to give you the impression he is grudging about it. he is enthusiastic about us getting a bill done and as i have said before, playing it just right. moving us forward, but giving us the space to come up with our agreement. and i thanked him and john thanked him for doing that and he is going to continue to do that so we can get a bill done. >> we briefed the president on a number of details, our proposal that the gang of eight is coming up that we will be bringing forward in the united states senate in as short a time as this evening. the president is supportive of the process we went through. the president having been in the senate and having seen this process before is very supportive. the p
trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> bill: there is breaking news on two significant stories tonight. first on the bombing here in boston. fox news confirms that a picture, an image of two men, two persons of interest is now being circulated through the law enforcement officials here in boston across the country looking for the identity of two men who were seen near the scene of the bombing explosions on monday afternoon near the finish line behind me on boylston street. this is an active investigation that is ongoing tonight. there san expected fbi briefing earlier tonight. that will not happen. as we mentioned a moment ago, there was an expected statement from the fbi. that, too, was cancelled. so, as this investigation moves forward, some trace evidence has been made public. some photographs of some of the bomb residue that was found on the street a quarter mile behind us here, that is circulating throughout the law enforcement community. and the public, for that matter as well. that's the latest on the boston bombings. an
. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "nightly business report." >> the dow falls sharply after yesterday's big move higher. we'll move beyond the volatility and get investment strategy for the long term. >> low rate? who wins and loses with interest rates at record-low levels. >> an art gallery bust.
. >> major funding for the pbs wshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
it to a nuclear explosion. that's coming up. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. very logical thinker. (laughs) i'm telling you right now, the girl back at home would absolutely not have taken a zip line in the jungle. (screams) i'm really glad that girl stayed at home. vo: expedia helps 30 million travelers a month find what they're looking for. one traveler at a time. expedia. find yours. man: how did i get here? dumb luck? or good decisions? ones i've made. ones we've all made. about marriage. children. money. about tomorrow. here's to good decisions. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. ready to plan for your family's future? we'll help you get there. are proven to be effective pain relievers. tylenol works by blocking pain signals to your brain. bayer advanced aspirin blocks pain at the site. try the power of bayer advanced aspirin. try the power when ouwe got a subaru.s born, it's where she said her first word. (little g
of the taliban, they're also very concerned about the economy post 2014 and their ant to seek proper employment. the chairman has outlined that we have eight million that are in school today. the issue is that we raised expectations and those expectations will have to be met with an economy that will support adequate jobs. >> as we look towards the end of 2014 is there a detailed transition plan with the state department and with u.s. a.i.d. for many of the projects that much begun and many that are on the books, where do those projects go as we look forward? >> senator, it is a very detailed transition process. we established a headquarters joust to oversee transition. we're completely overlinked with the a.i.d. and u.s. state department. not only do we have a broad transition plan from every task and we've taken that down to a handful of tasks that still remain to be worked out but every project that's out there right now will have a detailed transition plan as well. >> you mentioned before about security zones in the country, areas that are safer than others. as you look forward to the next
private initiative to the economy, and reagan realized that. you don't find out about this at the reagan library but reagan met with gorbachev at reykjavik, famously, and the two almost agreed to nuclear disarmament. the reaganites in the defense department were horrified by this and put a stop to it but reagan didn't go all the way with reaganism when he had a chance to end the cold war, especially the nuclear threats. so it's a hard-core republican belief. if you remember the pup pup prime -- republican primaries of 2012, it was not that long ago there were eight or ten republican candidates in simi valley for a debate at the reagan library and every one of them said reagan set the example how maring be strong, reagan did with the soviet union and we should do it today in iran, we should do it -- we were right toy trite in iraq. america should use its power to achieve its spend destroy its enemies. i worked in the cold war and in the middle east. you have 29% of the american people agree with that today. >> richard, do you want to say something? you're leaning forward. >> no. >> okay.
are down today more than 170 points, concerns of course about the global economy and some concerns as well about some earning inks reports particularly from bank of america here at home. we'll keep an eye on the dow and more breaking news in just a moment. girl vo: i'm pretty conservative. very logical thinker. (laughs) i'm telling you right now, the girl back at home would absolutely not have taken a zip line in the jungle. (screams) i'm really glad that girl stayed at home. vo: expedia helps 30 million travelers a month find what they're looking for. one traveler at a time. expedia. find yours. . >> trace: the information coming fast and furious, thank you for joining us. >> it's a good reminder it's developing, a lot of answers to be found. thank you for joining us, everybody, "america live" starts right now. >> megyn: fox news alert. two big stories we're following. word out of boston we could see a fbi news conference any moment now in the search for clues to this marathon bombing. second, a major investigation right now in our na
can live with that. many people believe this will make our information and economy quite safer. is a: catherine lotrionte professor at georgetown university and has been talking to us about cyber security and privacy. thank you for being on the program. guest: thank you. host: coming up, we will talk about an investigation into the gaps and oversight of compound pharmacies. today is saturday, april 20. we will be right back. >> i strongly urge you to come up with a number that tells this committee and the american people -- we have a responsibility as well. for you to say, we're just going to see how things turn out, he will determine the size of the 2014 force, i believe is a tragic and terrible this date for which we may pay a very heavy price -- mistake for which we may pay a very heavy price. tosenator, i didn't say leave it completely vague. we are advising and assisting at the battalion level. were going to lift off at the brigade level this fall. the 2014 number is inextricably linked to the number we believe we need to provide to assist post 2014. >> you have to wait till 201
it. >> in 1839, britain, at the moment it controls more of the world economy than it will ever do before or since, about 40% of world trade, go in and invades afghanistan. looks as if it's going to be incredibly easy. >> always does, doesn't it? >> they walk in as with many other subsequent invasions, looks as if everything's going to go very easy. within a few months they are busy ice skating. they brought their fox hounds. they've come up with 30 camels full of -- they brought three camels with cigars. one camel just carrying eau du cologne for the troops. all looks easy. within 18 months the most incredible jihad has been declared. the troops are completely surrounded. because they walked in so easily they haven't made any fortifications. they're surrounded on all sides by hills. the afghans capture their food and ammunition within about 48 hours. they shoot the deputy governor at the uprising. the main governor goes out to negotiate. he gets shot dead. you have a completely lead to this army without food, without ammunition in the middle of winter. all they can do is retreat.
i'm raising two girls on my own. i'll worry about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. ready to plan for your future? we'll help you get there. ♪ wow. ♪ what? ♪ mmm. it looks delicious! i didn't work out this morning. i should try it? yeah. actually pretty tasty. sausage, egg and cheese. mmm! this is from special k? no way! that changes things. [ female announcer ] new special k flatbread breakfast sandwiches. with multi-grain flatbread, eggs, sausage, and cheese. it's only 240 calories. if you guys can come back tomorrow, it'd be fantastic. [ female announcer ] a breakfast revelation. what will you gain when you lose? for a strong bag that] a bgrips the can...ion. get glad forceflex. small change, big difference. [ female announcer ] resisting the magical taste of silky smooth dove® chocolate is difficult. but choosing which one is even harder. go! is difficult. olive garden's new buy one, t
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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